Saturday, March 19, 2011

My thoughts on Inquiry Based Learning

As I pursue my Masters in Instructional Technology, I am taking the last (2) of (3) courses in my program. Inquiry Based Learning (IBL) is one course that is truly “new” to me and I have some thoughts about what I have learned this week. Over the past week my eyes have been opened and my mind has been prepped and filled with information about IBL that did not know.
The definition of IBL alone opened my mind to the fact that it meant that I would have to “Unlearn” so that I could learn. IBL is somewhat indefinable but the fact is that it does differ from the traditional approach to classroom instruction. I am intrigued on how a student’s lessons may change depending on their learning ability, which means the teacher has to be flexible in their teaching. At the same time with my early understanding of IBL, I am nervous about the process and the flexibility involved. I ‘ve learned that IBL can supply just about every type of student and their learning ability/disability. One interesting fact about IBL that I think many students would have to get accustom to the fact that the teacher does not have to be the center of information. By working together a flow of information can be discovered and distributed by the student and/or the teacher.

I have noticed that IBL is a deeper set of teaching and learning. It truly involves a different way that students involve their thinking process. The thinking process fits the train of thought like that of a detective or scientist. Questions can be asked but it requires that you use your talents to research (comprehend) and work towards the answer, which makes it a rewarding accomplishment.

With all that is involved with IBL, I am left with such questions as:
How long would it take for an educator to become well versed in the art of IBL? Does IBL work well with students who bring personal baggage with them to the classroom? Is parental involvement a major necessity with IBL? These and most likely more questions pop into my mind with hopes of getting an answer as I continue to learn.

My Name is Ben Green,...and this is "Where I've BEN!"

2 comments:

Matt said...

You have some very good learnings this week. Your questions are good ones:

How long would it take for an educator to become well versed in the art of IBL? It depends upon the individual. It is a different way of thinking, and the sooner one embraces this new way of the thinking, the easier it is to transition.


Does IBL work well with students who bring personal baggage with them to the classroom? I have had all types of students in my classroom over the years, and I would say so, but I have found with students like this, we must first gain their trust.


Is parental involvement a major necessity with IBL? I believe that it is helpful, but not a necessity. When you sit with parents and explain that you are preparing their son or daughter for their future, just not a state test, they undoubtedly support you.

AnotherBenG! said...

Thanks Matt,

I am very interested in this process and yet scared at the same time!

Ben G!