Sunday, April 10, 2011

My thoughts on Inquiry Based Learning wk.4


This week my lesson in Inquiry Based Learning has provided my brain with intellectual conversation about facts and concepts along with questions that assume to be investigative and non-investigative. I thought I had a grasp on what is considered a fact and what is a concept. The additional information that was added to my state of factual matter is that the facts focus is on verifiable and discrete details where as concepts tend to rely on the abstract. So now when a teacher or student requests, “ just the facts!” I ‘ll know to stick to the concrete matters.

The challenge this week seemed to be easy at first but upon close inspection I found that creating questions that are determined to be investigative were harder than creating the non-investigative. Some of my best questions start out as non-investigative but when my mind is not satisfied with the end result, I revamp them and they turn into investigative.

My thoughts this week include such questions as:
(1) Is there ever a time when a question can be so close to being non-investigative that it can actually be investigative?
(2) Can the definition of facts and concepts slow down the process of IBL in the classroom?
 



My Name is Ben Green,...and this is "Where I've BEN!"

1 comment:

Matt said...

(1) Is there ever a time when a question can be so close to being non-investigative that it can actually be investigative?

Well, yes. For example, "Why is the sky blue?" This can certainly be investigable, but can it be investigated in the classroom? There are several factors that influence the answer to this question, so in order to answer it, one must answer several smaller investigable questions before tackling this one. The answers from those smaller questions are the data, for non-investigable.




(2) Can the definition of facts and concepts slow down the process of IBL in the classroom?


Facts vs. concepts really isn't something that I would share with students. I don't think students need know the difference, but as teachers these certainly affect out planning. The bigger thing is building metacognition in students. Does a student know when he/she has gaps in their prior knowledge? If they do, then this will easy the difficulty in creating investigable questions.